You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘writing’ tag.

My electronic archives have been neglected this year as I took a turn back to the old ways, to relish the dying art of handwriting and its ancient tools, and to savor the privacy, tangibility, focus and flow that these tools afford. 

For some reason, this seems like a good time to share a gratuitous picture of a turtle I met this year.  Or maybe she’s not so gratuitous. Maybe she was a little spirit companion meant to remind me the value of slowing down, grounding, and seeking solitude.

turtle

But I didn’t come here today to share turtle pictures.  I wanted to show you one of my most prized possessions — a garden journal my sister made for me.

 

journal

 

She calls it a “junk journal,” though I don’t think that’s a fitting description. Every single page is embellished with awesomeness.

 

iris

There are all sorts of nooks and folds in which to tuck notes, thoughts, dreams, and ideas.  And she stocked it with seeds, charms, a vial of dandelion fluff upon which to make wishes, and all sorts of magic.

seeds.jpg

And these pictures do not even begin to do it justice.

butterfly.jpg

With this journal I am a garden wizard!  Next year, I should be able to grow a beanstalk to climb to find the goose who lays golden eggs.

It makes me happy.

The video below is her doing a complete flip-through of the journal in case you’re interested:

And if you want to see the other journals she’s created (e.g., Murder on the Orient Express), here’s a link to her channel:
Recycled by Skattur

Advertisements

Greetings Dear Searchers, Lurkers, Crawlers, and Readers.

I offer a warm welcome to my fellow Americans and guests who’ve made an appearance this week from Canada, Germany, Brazil, the UK, the Netherlands, Slovakia, India, and Australia! I’m baffled, astounded, and honored in equal measure by your presence, however brief, accidental, or intentional it might have been.

Tonight marks the first State of the Spacebook Address in this blog’s history.  As the sixth year anniversary of mylittlespacebook’s existence rapidly approaches, may we all pause to consider for a moment just how we came to be here.

Perhaps you were you were searching for a happy morning yoga playlist, which judging by the fact it’s one of the most frequently viewed posts, a lot of people are. Maybe you lit on the site in hopes of resolving some gender identity issues that had nothing at all to do with chickens. You might be a beloved family member or friend who reads semi-faithfully out of duty, for gossip fodder, or some other strange compulsion. Are you the mysterious, consistent reader who voyeuristically lurks in the shadows, but never comments?

Perhaps, like me, you were just wandering around when the landscape changed drastically and you can’t exactly remember how you got here or what this trip was supposed to be all about in the first place.  Lucky for me, I left a trail of electronic breadcrumbs to follow.

From my first post on June 9, 2010:

My vision here is just beginning to unfold, so  please overlook the banality of this first post.

I’m not entirely sure what will come next, but within the virtual walls of my little e-space you may find humorous anecdotes, half-intelligible thoughts hastily written in a chai-induced frenzy, a piece of blue glasssobering reports from the Society of Knitters and Nutters (SoKaN), reviews of books that strike my fancy, a dead rat  you can swing on a string, questionable questions, transcriptions of conversations recorded for posterity, ideas for inventions the world needs to make me happy, lists of things, a few polls, a kitten’s whisker, travel logs, observations from the natural world, philosophical contemplation, notes to self, and maybe even a pearl of wisdom if we get lucky.

Enjoy!

As I sit tapping out the current post in a chai-induced frenzy (some things never change) I am struck by how much my life has changed in the last six years and how much I have changed. I’ve gone from transient-academic-carnivore with a purse cat to domiciled-matronly-entrepreneurial-yogi-vegetarian with a flower and lettuce growing obsession.

**BREAKING NEWS:  I just realized my pants are on inside-out. I taught yoga tonight in inside-out pants and nobody had a word to say about it.  At least they were my inside-out pants and not not-my-pants. Now back to our regularly scheduled programming.**

What hasn’t changed is that I’m not entirely sure what will come next. It might be something profound or incredibly stupid. Let’s reconvene at a later date and see.

Thank you for being here and for reading.

 

books

books on the dresser

I bought a new book yesterday. It’s getting a little  out of hand…

books on the stairs

books on the stairs

I keep giving them away, yet they seem to be multiplying like rabbits.

books on the nightstand

books on the nightstand

There are actual bookshelves in this house…

books on the bathtub

books on the bathtub

There are several bookshelves actually, with books on them….

more books

more books on the dresser

See that book up there ^ with the ripped cover?  The title is “Getting Things Done” … I started it several years ago and never got it done…

books on the coffee table with MoonPie eying them warily

books on the coffee table with Moon Pie eyeing them warily

…and don’t even get me started on the journals…

journals on the floors

journals on the floors

s

Walter Anderson's boat

Walter Anderson’s boat

Love called me here.

–Dante, The Inferno

Our lives improve only when we take chances — and the first and most difficult risk we can take is to be honest with ourselves… [The] greatest risk of all: to be vulnerable, to allow others to see us as we really are.

–Walter Anderson

My palms got a little sweaty just typing the title of this post – that’s how nervous putting this resolution “out there” makes me.

Someone near and dear explained this same feeling during a conversation earlier this week.  Regarding an idea for a project he had been keeping top secret, he said, “I didn’t want to speak it into being because once I tell everybody, then I’m basically bound to make it so.  People will start asking me about it.”  The idea of being held accountable for pursuing your dreams is a scary prospect indeed.

Writing has  been a recurring theme in my resolutions over the years. “Write everyday” and  “get my work published” are just a couple of the variations. My work has seen publication several times now – once in dissertation form and several times in the form of co-authored articles in academic journals. I will not minimize these accomplishments. It was rigorous work and I have a lot of respect for science and the people who toil and revel in it.  If I had been honest with myself though, I would have abandoned that work long ago instead of getting caught up in other people’s notions of who I am and what I should be doing with my time. Being invited into collaboration was thrilling to the ego and working within an institution provided a fair degree of comfort and security. I learned a tremendous amount through the process, but I never felt particularly free or autonomous enough to write the things I wanted to write in that context.

Writing is something I do on an almost daily basis whether I’ve resolved to do it or not.  It’s how I process things. I think the format of a book will help keep me organized and focused. Because it is an independent project, it will require more self-discipline. This is why I decided to put this one “out there” instead of keeping it personal – I don’t want to back out of it or make the usual excuses to myself.

The topic of the book evolved from a presentation proposal I submitted on a whim to a yoga conference.  I never thought it would actually be accepted, but to my horror and delight it was. After I spent several months researching and preparing for the talk, the conference was cancelled.  I was both devastated and relieved – devastated because I had been looking forward to the conference and the trip and I had invested a lot of time and work into the topic and I wanted to share it.  I was relieved from having to deal with a somewhat stressful situation.  I was way out of my comfort zone. Public speaking does not come naturally to me.  Also, this conference was business-oriented instead of the academic/research-oriented type I’d experienced in the past. The good thing about the stress was that it kept my effort sustained and moving in one direction. That direction felt right. Now it’s a matter of changing the format and continuing the effort in book form.

Title: The Science of Yoga: The Risks and the Rewards

Author: William J. Broad

Why I Read It: As a yoga practitioner and teacher, I have experienced the transformational power of the practice, so I was curious to see how Western science, a reductionist endeavor, would parcel out a holistic experience and to what effect.  The book looked and quacked like science when I flipped through it quickly at the bookstore. Besides, Yoga Journal said it was “a well-researched book that belongs in the library of every yogi” right on the book’s cover.  Surely I needed this?

Synopsis: The author, a journalist and yoga practitioner, gives a brief account of yoga’s history and describes some of the gurus’ claims on health, mood, healing, sex, and creativity.  He smatters in various sorts of research tidbits in the attempt to substantiate those claims or refute them.

Highlights: The book provides an introduction to some researchers and practitioners of interest.  The chapter on the risks of yoga was an original and helpful contribution that added to my knowledge base for particular poses.

Lowlights: If you’re going to use the word “science” in a book’s title, you really need to bring it. The science reporting here lacked rigor and clarity.  It was a mishmosh of personal anecdotes and poorly explained studies delivered with the sort of content and writing style better suited to a gossip magazine. I give you an example: “Ranjit Singh was an ugly little man who liked to surround himself with beautiful women” (p. 13).  What this has to do with yoga or science is beyond me. Also, I think the author tried to cover too many topics with too little depth and he was overly focused on the sensational (like the sophomoric chapter on sex) at the expense of the substantial.

 

This is ecstasy, and behind the ecstasy is something else, which is hard to explain.  It is like a momentary vacuum into which rushes all that I love.  A sense of oneness with sun and stone. A thrill of gratitude to whom it may concern-to the contrapuntal genius of human fate or to tender ghosts humoring a lucky mortal.

–Vladimir Nabokov

The last few weeks I have passed many a quiet hour in the company of a brilliant and fascinating dead man.

While I sat in a chair swinging and sipping a cup of steaming tea, he shared detailed memories of his happy childhood.  Near the warm glow of a fire, he taught me new words (cacology, fop, vicissitudes, incunabula, and impecunious) and secret things about butterflies. I was saddened by his tales of war and exile, even as he kept these in the periphery of a vividly lived life. He showed me sunsets in Berlin, gardens in St. Petersburg, and seashores along the western coast of France.  Last night as I turned the last page of Nabokov’s memoir, it felt a lot like losing a friend.  What a beautiful mind.

Speak, Memory; An Autobiography Revisited is the literary equivalent of a truffle.  I savored it in small bites, never wanting it to end.

 

 

 To laugh often and much; to win the respect of intelligent people and the affection of children; to earn the appreciation of honest critics and endure the betrayal of false friends; to appreciate beauty; to find the best in others; to leave the world a little better, whether by a healthy child, a garden patch or a redeemed social condition; to know even one life has breathed easier because you have lived. 

This is to have succeeded.

–Ralph Waldo Emerson

I am so happy to be celebrating the success of a friend.  She has certainly succeeded by Emerson’s standards — and tomorrow my shimmy sister, Debra Parmley, releases her fourth book, Trapping the ButterflyThis one is set in the 1920s in one of my favorite weekend getaways: Hot Springs, Arkansas. I cannot wait to read it!

Last night she had a radio interview about the book, which you can listen to HERE.

You can watch the book trailer from her third novel, Aboard the Wishing Star, below:

And be sure to check out her blog!  She does a fun series of interviews called “Cover Model Corner” with those hunky men of romance novels.

Just in case you missed the other book trailer I posted (I love these things), you can find it HERE.

Yay Debra! You’re awesome. 🙂

Creativity is contagious. Pass it on.

-Albert Einstein

Title: The Creative Habit: Learn It and Use It for Life

Author: Twyla Tharp

Synopsis: Master choreographer, Twyla Tharp, interweaves stories about what makes her creative life tick with advice and exercises to help others develop their own creative habit.

Why I read it: Because Caitlin Kelley wrote that it was one of her favorite books ever, which instantly made it a must-read.  She described it as, “Kick-ass and inspiring in equal measure.”


You might like this if you liked: The War of Art: Break Through the Blocks and Win Your Inner Creative Battles
(Steven Pressfield)

Highlights: You don’t have to be a dancer to appreciate this book – she gives lots of examples from other creative walks of life, including the business world.  That said, her descriptions of how she choreographs and teaches dance were fascinating.  My favorite chapter was the one on failure. She used one of her own productions as a case study on failure and what to do about it. The rigor and brutal self-assessment/honesty with which she handled the topic were impressive.

Fun coincidence: One of Tharp’s methods to harness and organize creativity is by starting with a physical box because as she puts it, “before you can think out of the box you have to start with a box.” She devotes an entire chapter to the box and what she puts in it and why.  In an entirely unrelated conversation, a friend recently invited me to craft an intention box with her – same idea as what I was learning from Tharp, but different verbiage. Crafty boxing fun will be had this week.

Dear Readers,

 

Let me introduce you to Beth Ann.  She’s a wonderful lady  with a generous spirit who writes a blog called “It’s Just Life.”  She writes about happy things, teapots, crafting, books, and recipes. One of the coolest things about Beth Ann is this: for every comment she gets on her blog she donates 50 cents to a cause.  This month she is helping a family out with medical expenses.  She wants to give even more, so she’s set up a Giveaway basket for a lucky reader to win.  Do a good deed — please go visit her blog today.  You will find the link below.  Be sure to leave her a comment!

Giveaway with an Ulterior Motive.

 

Thank you!

LE

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Archives

Advertisements
The Goddess Attainable

For goddesses like me, living each day as perfectly imperfect women in the real world.

The Druid Herbalist

An ongoing journey with the healing power of plants

The Fledgling Belly

The Adventures of a Discerning Bellydancer

It's Just Life

Finding the Extraordinary in the Ordinary

Down the Forest Path

A Journey Through Nature, its Magic and Mystery

Project: Motion Blog

Modern. MOVEment. Memphis.

The Human Rights Warrior

"There is some good in this world...and it's worth fighting for." ~ J.R.R. Tolkien

The Tragic Life of Frank

Around five minutes ago I had this sudden revelation; that my life is quite sufficiently, tragic.

zona pellucida

...blinded by the light

Donna Mejia

Dance Artist/Scholar/Cultural-Creative

Threading the Web

One author and writing coach sharing the threads of writing life

shimmymobmemphis

dancing to change the world

samrarose

Just another WordPress.com site

Peaceful Hands Reiki

Where love flows

LibrarianShipwreck

"More than machinery, we need humanity."

Sorry Television

Reading a book a week

Mark Coakley

Author of "Hidden Harvest" and "Tip and Trade"

Garden Variety

A Gardening, Outdoor Lifestyle and Organic Food & Drink Blog

CultFit

Form, Flow and Grace

Owls and Orchids

Life, Love, Spiritual Living and the odd Catastrophe.....

Life Beyond Beliefs

Never give up

West Seventh Freelance

Photography, seeking, writing...and learning along the way. Want to come along?!

chriscondello

Green Thumbed Vagabond

Skatturcast's Blog

Crafting is good for the soul!

Peri's Spice Ladle

Indian-inspired Food for the Global Palate

everyday gurus

Everyday, Everywhere We Are Guided Towards Happiness

Lake Superior Spirit

Blogging from the Upper Peninsula North Woods...

Memphis Backyard Farmer

Country life in the big city of Memphis

Heifer 12 x 12

A global blogging adventure to visit Heifer International projects in 12 countries in 12 months in 2012

The World According To 12ax7el34...

Performing Arts * Culinary Arts * Visual Arts * Life